NO ENGINE - POWERED BY WIND

Dragon Force 65 radio controlled sailboat

IT'S YOUR SKILL THAT COUNTS

 

Play2Sail aims to provide the ultimate radio sailing experience: in our fleet, all radio controlled racing yachts are one-design racing class - international Dragon Force 65.

Our boats have been developed for racing. So they are fun & fast but also easy to sail.

Dragon Force 65 (DF65) sailboat has been already chosen to race from more than 15.000 skippers around the World.

 

Photos of the product Dragon Force 65 in this page: courtesy of www.ripmax.com | copyright © www.ripmax.com

DRAGON FORCE 65 SPECIFICATION:

LengTH: 655 mm
Beam: 116.5 mm
MAST HEIGHT: 915 MM
overall height: 1338 mm
RTR TOTAL WEIGHT: 1350 g
SAIL AREA (OVERALL): 22.26 DM2

 
 

Sail2Play sailboats are driven by simple control systems

Your Play2Sail boats uses the power of the wind acting on sails to propel the boat forward.

The two main controls of your sailboat are the rudder - used to control the direction of the boat in the water, and sail trim - that refers to the angle of the sails in relation to the boat hull.

Based on the direction of the wind and the orientation of the boat hull, sail trim is adjusted to harness the wind and keep the boat moving forward.

Your sailboat is fully controlled from the piers via a very simple remote control unit (2.4 GHz 4CH stick type transmitter) that gives you finger-tip control over the rudder and over the sails. On the boat, the radio receiver is connected to two battery-powered electric motors or servos. One servo controls the position of both main and jib sails together (allowing the sails to be trimmed), the other the position of the rudder (allowing the boat to be steered). By changing the position of the two joysticks on the transmitter signals on the radio are sent to the sailboat and they are converted into motion that operates the rudder and sails.

 

DRAGON FORCE 65 IS BORN TO RACE

 Dragon Force 65 racing | Photo courtesy and copyright © Alan Bevan

Dragon Force 65 racing | Photo courtesy and copyright © Alan Bevan